Plants and Potions

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Plants and Potions

Post  seraphim on Wed 23 Dec 2009, 04:21

(This was crowding out the health thread so made a new topic.......hope I don't get a lashing for this Twisted Evil)
continued....What if datura turns on genes that normally don't work temporarly so that a person can finally percieve other realities. Here is where I found the genetics that talked of Datura and corn.

Later historical accounts of Datura include Christoval Acosta's Tractado de las Drogas y Medicinas de las Indias Orientales (1578). He describes the use of Datura in the East Indies as an aphrodisiac and also states that the seeds were highly prized treasures by Hindu enamorades, who ground them into a powder to be added to wine or some other medium. Herbalist Li Shi-Chen, in a work on Chinese medicines entitled Peu ts'ao Kang mu (15 90), explained the origin of the Chinese name for Datura. Man t'o lo h ua is said to be taken from the famous Buddhist sutra "Fa hua ching," which states that when Buddha preaches a sermon from heaven, dew forms on the petals of Datura from raindrops. According to the Taoist tradition though, the name refers to a specific star whose envoy is supposed to carry a Datura flower in one hand (Safford 1922:540). These early accounts of the plant offer valuable insight into its widespread use and rich history. But while Datura continued to.be investigated, the most thorough study was conducted in the early 20th century by Albert F. Blakeslee, who spent most of his career using the plant to conduct groundbreaking research Into plant genetics.

Perhaps the most Important contribution of Datura, at least in sclentIfIc terms, is its use as a research subject to better understand fundamental biological principles (Heiser 1069:141). Datura plants contain 12 pairs of chromosomes normally, but trisomic (2n+1) individuals can be grown which have an extra chromosome in one of their twelve sets. This was discovered by Blakeslee, who went on to identify twelve primary mutants, each with one of the normal chromosomes as an extra, and for many of these, two secondary mutants where the extra chromosome was a reduplicated half of the one of the normal ones (Avery 1959:viii). The Blakeslee himself understood the Implications of his work, as evident when he wrote an article for Smithsonian in 1930 and stated, "...it is our belief that in the future extra chromosomes will be consciously utilized as a source of desirable variations in plants of economic Importance" (449). How right he was!
The numerous variations genetically in the plant has amazed many researchers and it is believed that "Datura now probably displays a larger number of distinguishable types due to gene mutations than any other species of plants except corn

The daturine alkaloids are also known to cause dilation of the pupil of the eye (mydriasis) and paralysis of the muscles of accommodation (cycloplegia). They effect the nervous system too, with atropine acting as a stimulant and hyoscine as a depressant. Atropine is used to counteract the depression associated with morphine and hyoscine acts as an antidote to highly toxic phosphate insecticides and so called "nerve gases." Other applications of hyoscine Include prevention of motion sickness, as an analgesic along with morphine in obstetrics to produce "twilight sleep," and as a truth drug (Avery 1959:51).
While people may not have been aware of the chemical constituency of Datura, the plant was used medicinally all over the world in historical times. in the Old World, the Chinese used Datura to treat colds and nervous conditions (Siegel 1989:21). in India, the powdered seeds were mixed with butter and taken internally for impotence as well as being applied to genitalia to obtain sexual vigor (Lewis 1977:330). Referred to as the tuft of Shiva, the god of destruction, Datura was also used in the form of a liquid extract by thugs - worshipers of Kali, the goddess of fertility and death - to stupefy sacrificial victims. The plant was also given to young girls in India to bring them Into prostitution as well as on their clients (Siegel 1989:21). The leaves were smoked as well in that country to relieve asthma (Lewis 1977:395).
http://www.ethnoleaflets.com/leaflets/datura.htm
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sun 12 Sep 2010, 11:13



Caralluma fimbriata

Caralluma fimbriata is a succulent plant in the family Apocynaceae. It has been eaten in rural India for centuries, raw, as a vegetable with spices, or preserved in chutneys and pickles, and is often found as a roadside shrub or boundary marker.

It has been used as a portable food and thirst quencher for hunting. It is also used for its purported ability to suppress hunger and appetite and enhance stamina. It is believed to have an effect on the appetite control centre of the brain.[citation needed] Tribesmen on a day's hunt will often only pack some Caralluma fimbriata to sustain themselves and hence it is commonly known as "famine food" in India.

In a small clinical trial conducted in India, modest benefits of Caralluma fimbriata extracts were observed.In the study, 50 overweight individuals were given either a placebo or one gram of extract each day for 60 days. Compared to the placebo group, individuals receiving the extract showed no significant change in body weight, body mass index, hip circumference, body fat or energy intake; however, both appetite and waist circumference were reduced.

Various diet pills claiming to contain Caralluma fimbriata extracts are aggressively marketed for weight loss. However there is no independent evidence to suggest that the amount of extract found in these products is sufficient to obtain the same results as the clinical trial. The FTC cautions against the use of such "miracle diet" products.

The key phytochemical constituents of the herb are pregnane glycosides, flavone glycosides, megastigmane glycosides, and saponins.

“The effect of Caralluma extract was assessed in overweight individuals by a placebo controlled randomized trial. Fifty adult men and women (25-60 years) with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 25 kg/m2 were randomly assigned into a placebo or experimental group; the latter received 1 g of Caralluma extract per day for 60 days. All subjects were given standard advice regarding a weight reducing diet and physical activity.

At the end of 30 and 60 days of intervention, waist circumference and hunger levels over the observation period showed a significant decline in the experimental group when compared to the placebo group. There was also a trend towards a greater decrease in body weight, body mass index, hip circumference, body fat and energy intake between assessment time points in the experimental group…

Conclusion: Caralluma extract appears to suppress appetite, and reduce waist circumference when compared to placebo over a 2 month period.

Kuriyan R, Raj T, Srinivas SK, Vaz M, Rajendran R, Kurpad AV. Division of Nutrition, Institute of Population Health and Clinical Research, St John’s National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore 560034, India.”

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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sun 05 Dec 2010, 21:14

The mystery of the carrot



According to historic records, the carrot has a very indeterminate origin beleived to be from the Afghan region , but what is puzzling , is what turned this thing orange .
It is beleived that dutch farmers cultivated the now dominant orange variety influenced by their House of Orange
The carrot is / was more normally a purple colour and thought to have contained far more anti-oxidants in that striation

What and where the orange gene came from is not for sure certain

I must seek out some purple ones and try them , they look so good

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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Mon 06 Dec 2010, 23:07

cant source any around me at present, will have to look further afield, anyone on this forum encountered them ?
if not, it seems they have been overun by the house of orange apart from a few traditionalists , thank god for the evola spirit of preservation
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  seraphim on Tue 07 Dec 2010, 07:15

I've seen more purple potatoes than purple carrots. Don't think I've ever tried those carrots. But I believe it's from genetic diversity, way back when we used to have more variety. which is good, just in case a fungus kill off all the orange ones.
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  tgII on Tue 07 Dec 2010, 09:37

Kapis, those dark carrots are sold at a few grocery stores here in
Tokyo, and although I haven't tried them yet, I prefer not to report
my findings here on this board if I do less that little vulture accuses
me of being a dark carrot COINTELPRO agent against/for Wikileaks.

tongue
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Tue 07 Dec 2010, 17:40

I prefer not to report my findings here on this board if I do less that little vulture accuses
me of being a dark carrot COINTELPRO agent against/for Wikileaks.

Dark humour is so under-rated, but not by me Very Happy would love to hear the purple carrot feedbacks TG if you can surmount the accusations of Ladadeladada Cool
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Tue 07 Dec 2010, 17:45

I knew this about carrots and the purple variety.
But I have never ever seen the purple variety for sale in any store in which I have shopped.
But I would certainly try them if they were available.
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Tue 04 Jan 2011, 15:14



The sAlvia Plant - favoured mind adjuster of the present times , anyone encountered this ?

Salvia, a genus of the mint family, is commonly referred to as sage and derives its name from the Latin 'salvere' (to save), so called because of the herb's ancient reputation for healing properties.

Growing to more than 3ft in height, Salvia divinorum ('sage of the seers') has large green leaves and white flowers and is native to the Mazatec region of southern Mexico. The native shamans have for centuries chewed the plant's leaves to induce visions as part of spiritual and healing ceremonies and it is know in the Mazatec language as 'ska Maria Pastora' – a reference to the Virgin Mary that bears testimony to the fusion of traditional Indian customs and Roman Catholicism. It remained almost unknown outside the region until Daniel Siebert, a Californian ethnobotanist who was studying the use of herbs in spiritual traditions, came across the plant during his research in the Seventies. Today, it is sold as an extract: the '10x concentrate' is 10 times the potency of the unprocessed leaf. Prices for a gram on one British website range from £10 for the 5x extract to £35 for the 50x extract. In return, the website promises a whole range of 'out of body' experiences including: the sensation of travelling through time; encounters with divine beings; a flight over astral landscapes; and the chance to find some of life's hidden answers and secret knowledge.

I love the sincere warnings from the "professionals"

Prof Schifano is certainly alarmed. 'I am concerned about the use and misuse of Salvia divinorum because it contains an active ingredient that can trigger hallucinations,' he says. 'And as a result for some vulnerable individuals, this may mean the onset of a psychotic episode.'

Oh and alcohol can not give halucinations in excess ?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/5090078/Salvia-more-powerful-than-LSD-and-legal.html

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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Tue 04 Jan 2011, 18:28

When I tried it I first felt a tingle over my skin.

Then the upper palate of the roof of my mouth actually felt like it was gently shearing (slight pressure) as two independent left and right parts. This was a strange feeling, but quite interesting to actually sense a cranial suture separating and moving.

Then I took another hit and ended up slowly lying down on my back on the floor and uncontrollably laughing my ass off for about five minutes non-stop. Nothing, not alcohol or weed, has ever made me laugh that hard.
The laughing had loosened a copious amounts of old mucous from inside my lungs and I stuck my head out the door to spit it out. That was quite a cleansing experience as my ribcage felt much lighter and freer after that being expelled and having laughed so hard for so long.

I later tried it another two after this and it did absolutely nothing at all other than make me slightly dizzy. Basically no effects whatsoever. So I knew my time with "Sally" was finished.

If I traveled to South America and had a shaman whip up some Ayahuasca...I would probably give it a try...but only with his guidance with proper preparation and a shamanic intent.

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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Tue 04 Jan 2011, 20:19

Then I took another hit and ended up slowly lying down on my back on the floor and uncontrollably laughing my ass off for about five minutes non-stop. Nothing, not alcohol or weed, has ever made me laugh that hard.

Sampled a consignment of grass back in the 80s that did just this effect, most memorable experience on drugs, lying on the floor of a public takeaway shop with 2 other people in uncontrollable laughter actually having to crawl out of the shop , just because we found something completly absurdly funny about the normal way the owner said " can i help u guys "
Yeah these were really positive drug stories , but i have some negative ones to balance things up too Very Happy
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Fri 22 Jul 2011, 23:13

An absolute excellent presented and filmed piece on the intelligence of nature

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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  seraphim on Thu 11 Aug 2011, 05:18

Great for critters in the teeth
Spilanthes
http://www.localharvest.org/spilanthes-seed-C6370

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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 01 Sep 2012, 00:42



Guano

Guano (via Spanish, ultimately from the Quechua wanu, meaning 'dung') is the excrement (feces and urine) of seabirds, cave dwelling bats, and seals. Guano manure is an effective fertilizer due to its high levels of phosphorus and nitrogen and its relative lack of odor compared to other forms of organic fertilizer such as horse manure.

Guano consists of ammonium oxalate and urate, phosphates, as well as some earth salts and impurities. Guano also has a high concentration of nitrates. Bird guano has a fertilizer analysis of 11 to 16 percent nitrogen, 8 to 12 percent equivalent phosphoric acid, and 2 to 3 percent equivalent potash. Bat and seal guano are lower in fertilizer value than bird guano.
[
The word "guano" originates from the Quichua language of the Andes and means "the droppings of sea birds". Andean peoples collected guano from the coast of Peru for use as soil enricher. The rulers of the Inca Empire assigned great value to guano, restricting access to it and punishing any disturbance of the birds with death.
Guano has been harvested over several centuries along the coast of Peru, where islands and rocky shores have been sheltered from humans and predators. The Guanay Cormorant has historically been the most important producer of guano; its guano is richer in nitrogen than guano from other seabirds. Other important guano producing species off the coast of Peru are the Peruvian Pelican and the Peruvian Booby.

In November 1802, Alexander von Humboldt studied guano and its fertilizing properties at Callao in Peru, and his subsequent writings on this topic made the subject known in Europe.

The high concentration of nitrates also made guano an important strategic commodity. The discovery during the 1840s of the use of guano as a fertilizer and its Chile saltpetre content as a key ingredient in explosives made the area strategically valuable.

In this context the US passed the Guano Islands Act in 1856 giving citizens discovering a source of guano the right to take possession of unclaimed land and entitlement to exclusive rights to the deposits. However, the guano could only be removed for the use of citizens of the United States. This enabled US citizens to take possession of unoccupied islands containing guano.

Control over guano played an important role in the Chincha Islands War (1864–1866) between Spain and a Peruvian-Chilean alliance since Spain occupied with its navy the Chincha Islands depriving Peru of lucrative income.

In the second half of the 19th century guano extraction was eclipsed by salpeter in the form of caliche extraction from the interior of Atacama Desert, not far from the guano areas. After the War of the Pacific (1879–1883) Chile seized much of the guano as well as salpeter producing area making its national treasury grow by 900% between 1879 and 1902 due to taxes coming from the newly acquired lands

The importance of guano deposits faded after 1909 when Fritz Haber developed the Haber-Bosch process of industrial nitrogen fixation (nitrogen gas from the air converted into liquid ammonia fertilizer). The Haber process is important today because the fertilizer generated from ammonia is responsible for sustaining one-third of the Earth's population. It is estimated that half of the protein within human beings is made of nitrogen that was originally fixed by this process, the remainder was produced by nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea.

The ideal type of guano is found in exceptionally dry climates, as rainwater drains the guano of nitrates. Guano is harvested on various islands in the Pacific Ocean (for example, the Chincha Islands) and in other oceans (for example, Juan de Nova Island and Christmas Island). These islands have been home to mass seabird colonies for many centuries, and the guano has collected to a depth of many metres. In the 19th century, Peru was famous for its supply of guano.

Bat guano is usually mined in caves and this mining is associated with a corresponding loss of troglobytic biota and diminishing of biodiversity. Guano deposits support a great variety of cave-adapted invertebrate species, which rely on bat feces as their sole nutrient input. In addition to the biological component, deep guano deposits contain local paleoclimatic records in strata that have built up over thousands of years, which are unrecoverable once disturbed.

The greatest damage caused by mining to caves with extant guano deposits is to the bat colonies themselves. Bats are highly vulnerable to regular disturbance to their roosts. Some species, such as Phyllonycteris aphylla, have low fat reserves, and will starve to death when regularly disturbed and put into a panic state during their resting period. Many species will drop pups when in panic, with subsequent death, leading to a steady reduction in population. Research in Jamaica has shown that mining for bat guano is directly related to the loss of bat species, associated invertebrates and fungi, and is the greatest threat to bat caves on the island.

In agriculture and gardening guano has a number of uses, including as: soil builder, lawn treatments, fungicide (when fed to plants through the leaves), nematicide (decomposing microbes help control nematodes), and as composting activator (nutrients and microbes speed up decomposition).
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sun 02 Sep 2012, 14:51

...peruvian seabird guano, earthworm castings and seaweed extract...excellent for any ganja growing soil nutritive medium.
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Re: Plants and Potions

Post  highnoon on Fri 21 Sep 2012, 07:25

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