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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Tue 25 Sep 2012, 02:46

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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 15 Jun 2013, 00:20

THE FAUSTIAN URGE



In the late Middle Ages there lived in Germany a remarkable scholar reputed to have unraveled Nature’s mysteries and to be able to employ his knowledge in wondrous and magical ways. Some regarded him as a skilled alchemist, who had acquired his powers through diligent work: in the laboratory; others said he was only a trickster, who was more a master of sleight-of-hand than of alchemy; but most eventually came to regard him as a conjurer, who had made a pact with the Devil, exchanging his soul in return for knowledge and power.
The mysterious scholar was Doctor Johann Faust (c. 1480–c. 1538), and the many legends which grew up about him captured the imaginations of writers, poets, and composers in succeeding generations. Half a century after his death there was published in Germany a book comprising these legends, Historia von Dr. Johann Fausten, by Johann Spiess, which soon appeared also in English and French versions.
Late in the 16th century the English playwright Christopher Marlowe wrote his Tragical History of Doctor Faustus based on these legends. After that countless others took up the Faust theme: the theme of man striving to exceed his ordained bounds, seeking knowledge beyond that allotted to others.
The most noted writer in this vein was Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the first part of whose long dramatic poem Faust was published in 1808. Drawing primarily on Goethe’s treatment, Berlioz and Gounod, among others, composed operas. Throughout the 19th century and well into the 20th, symphonies, poems, plays, and novels dealing with the Faust legend continued to appear.
The subject evidently resonates with something deep in the European soul. In fact, one may easily see a precursor of the Faust legend in that of Odin, whose quest for truth and understanding led him to give up one of his eyes and to be hanged for nine days from the World Tree.
In the many versions of the Faust legend various elements are emphasized, but the persistent theme is that mentioned above: the quest of exceptional men for an understanding of life and Nature: the reaching out for a new level of existence, for a fuller development of latent powers.
It is from this persistent theme, rather than from the semi-historical account of the life of Dr. Johann Faust or from anyone of the fictional works using his name that we draw the meaning attached to the adjective “Faustian” today. The word refers to a spiritual tendency in the race which has shown such fascination down through the ages with the idea behind the Faust legend. It describes a fundamental urge or drive latent in the soul of European man—and active in a few exceptional Europeans.
The Faustian urge in our race-soul says to us: “Thou shalt not rest or be content, no matter what thy accomplishments. Thou must strive all the days of thy life. Thou must discover all things, know all things, master all things.”
European man’s Faustian urge is quite different from the urge in the Levantine soul to accumulate, to possess, the craving to pile up money beyond all reason, the lust for personal aggrandizement. And it is, of course, antithetical to what might be called the mañana spirit of the Latin peoples, which says to them: “Enjoy life. Don’t hurry. You don’t need to know what lies beyond the next ridge.”
It is the source of both our basic restlessness as a race and our basic inquisitiveness. It is what makes adventurers of us, drives us to risk our lives in ventures which can bring us no conceivable material benefit—something which is totally foreign to other races, accustomed to judging everything according to its utility only.
It is the Faustian urge which has made our race the pre-eminent race of explorers, which has driven us to scale the highest mountains in lands inhabited by men of other races who have been content to remain always in the valleys. It is what, more than intellect alone, has made us likewise the pre-eminent race of scientists—especially in those days before the practice of science became a well-paid profession. It is what sent us to another world and has us now reaching for the stars.
But the Faustian urge is also more than all these things. It raises those imbued with it above the economic men, who, in the eyes of Western politicians and Eastern commissars, of labor bosses and captains of industry, of neo-liberal Democrats and conservative Republicans alike, are the sole denizens of the earth. It makes of man more than a mere consumer or producer. It is, more than anything else, the manifestation of the Divine in man’s soul.
The opening scene in Goethe’s Faust conveys the idea of the Faustian spirit expressed above: Faust is a restless scholar who has plumbed all of human knowledge but whose soul remains unslaked, his craving for ultimate truth unabated. Alone in his study, late at night, he gazes with a mixture of awe and desire on the sign of the Macrocosmos, and he says to himself, “Was it a god who engraved this sign which stills my inner tumult and fills my heart with joy, which with a mysterious force unveils the secrets of Nature all around me? . . . Where shall I grasp thee, oh infinite Nature?”
But Goethe paints other aspects of his protagonist’s character besides the one we have called “Faustian.” It may be that a better or, at least, less ambiguous—adjective would be “Odyssean” or “Ulyssean,” because the English poet Alfred Tennyson, in one short poem, really strikes closer to the sense of the word that we want to convey than does Goethe or any of the other writers about the Faust legend.
Tennyson’s hero’s desire is “to follow knowledge like a sinking star, / beyond the utmost bound of human thought.” To Ulysses, “all experience is an arch wherethro’ / gleams that untravelled world whose margin fades / for ever and for ever when I move.”
Even in old age, after a much fuller and more eventful life than ordinary men are granted, Ulysses says, “’Tis not too late to seek a newer world. / . . . my purpose holds / to sail beyond the sunset, and the baths / of all the western stars, until I die.” He sees himself as “made weak by time and fate, but strong in will / to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.”
And just as Goethe’s Faust is contrasted with his famulus, or student-servant, the pedantic Wagner, even more strongly—and much more concisely—does Tennyson contrast Ulysses with his son Telemachus, a man of “slow prudence . . . centered in the sphere / of common duties,” and quite lacking in his father’s driving spirit.
Yet, common usage favors “Faustian” over “Ulyssean,” and we shall be satisfied with it.
From a strictly anthropological viewpoint, we may seek a clue to European man’s Faustian tendency in the particulars of his evolutionary development. He was, for 10,000 generations, a hunter of the herds of bison and reindeer and mammoths which roamed the frozen plain of northern Europe during the Ice Ages. We might expect, therefore, that he should show the inquisitiveness he does, which is the mark of the predator, whether cat or man—but we might also ask why other races which went through a hunting phase do not show it to the same degree.
We might expect, because our ancestors followed the herds in their seasonal migrations for so many centuries, owning only the property they could carry on their backs, that they should have acquired the restlessness of the wanderer, while more sedentary races should have become, over the eons, more inclined to accumulation and less to exploration. But, again, there have been more southerly nomadic races which seem not to have become imbued with the Faustian spirit.
The rigor of the northern climate, the challenge of the ever-changing seasons certainly shaped the character of our race as strongly as any other factor. Aggressiveness, venturesomeness, boldness were traits which enabled our ancestors to find and exploit every scarce possibility for survival in a harsh and unforgiving environment. But the Mongoloid peoples, who evolved in a similarly harsh environment, seem to have responded somewhat differently to it and are today characterized more by stolidity than venturesomeness.
We can only conclude that the Faustian spirit is the consequence of a unique and transitory combination of causative factors, to which a single race was exposed over a period just long enough to effect the necessary genetic transformation and give it a tenuous racial basis. Even in our own race it manifests itself strongly only in the few who prefer adventure to advantage, accomplishment to acquisition, self-knowledge to self-satisfaction, the conquest of new worlds to the convenience and safety of the old, a true understanding of the Absolute to the unquestionability of a narrow orthodoxy.
The race which is the bearer of this spirit must, therefore, be doubly careful that its genetic basis is preserved—that it does not become a race solely of lawyers, clerks, laborers, and merchants but remains a race also of philosophers, explorers, poets, and inventors: of seekers of ultimate knowledge, of strivers toward the perfection which is Godhood.
When we take the longest viewpoint, we can see that the Faustian spirit, tenuous though it may be, is European man’s entire justification for existence.
Source: National Vanguard, no. 65, 1978; reprinted in The Best of Attack! and National Vanguard Tabloid, ed. Kevin Alfred Strom (Arlington, Va.: National Vanguard Books, 1984), p. 145.
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Wed 13 Nov 2013, 22:50




I recently commented on gagas more recent lack of creative quality song making and that may still stand till I've heard second hand there latest album

But just viewed tonight her latest uk interview on the culture show on bbc2 uk, interviewed by miranda sawyer, and i have to say , this gaga is thee most interesting female pop artiest in many moons, she's a rare philosophically expressive female and she makes some superb points about becoming your creative self , whats important etc, also takes a clean swing at the torment of the corporate whore etc etc, I'm really quite admiring of her minds ongoing public interview expressions , its very encouraging to hear a mainstream celeb holding the mark of creative individuality and the sacredness of the self and protecting its unique development with humility and discipline always giving credence to / and with the guidance of past masters

I don't think the interviewer grasped the depth of what gaga was getting at as she was more bedazzled by gagas distractive strangeness and loving presence which can be a deflective distraction that also demands admirers who may later get what she's getting at philosophically when they ready too.



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Re: Philosophers

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sat 16 Nov 2013, 00:04

She recently stated that she is smoking about twenty joints of marijuana a day...now couple that with her captivatation by the typical fuck-upedness of Jew art.
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 16 Nov 2013, 00:10

is that right ?  its done her some good ,  I'm attracted to females with self analysing minds , even though her music sucks now and i don't fancy her at all physically
Sometimes i feel like i should get back on the gunja , maybe it would do me some good too Shocked Cool 
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Re: Philosophers

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sat 16 Nov 2013, 00:34

Marijuana certainly has its benefits. But twenty joints a day will eventually have negative consequences...as that is either escapism or self-medicating to reduce stress without removing the stressor.

Usually most just go through it and then reduce or stop its use. But marijuana is much more preferable over pharmaceuticals in this regard.
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 16 Nov 2013, 00:52

Concise reply qsc, and thats is why i don't return to its aromatic persuasions , reasons as you elaborated
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Re: Philosophers

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sat 16 Nov 2013, 12:27

I also think marijuana begins to take you to other realms, but just does not have the chemical composition to take one there.
So many over-indulge when perhaps they should try the ayahuasca for that furtherance into exploration that marijuana just cannot accomplish.
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 16 Nov 2013, 16:14

i remember various strains like nepalese etc going in that direction, but finally a sleep would more often be induced in which dreaming could be abstract

so the gunja seemed to have a sleep inducing effect much like alcohol can also do at extremes , although you will find some users that can take each all day without that effects, but they can die early too (;

Whereas things like magic mushrooms , lsd etc induce energisation of the physicality as well as the mind altered state , but the danger there is that the existing personality can be virtually lost or overwritten if someone strays in too deep without experience
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Re: Philosophers

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sat 16 Nov 2013, 17:16

And from what I have read of people's accounts who have taken mushrooms, peyote, LSD and synthetic DMT...nothing compares to the jungle brew of the south American shaman.
Again, this experience needs to be done in the context for which it comes from...with an evaluation and with guidance of a well-intentioned shaman.  He may determine that your first few times are not to be done with a full dose.  But from what I have read and discussed, none of these other substances come close to the experience when it comes to inner development.

I can only speculate because I have never done anything but marijuana and hashish in the past.
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Mon 18 Nov 2013, 01:34

Im trying to recall for sure if david ike claimed to have taken that special south american brew back in the 80s/90s which off course led to his "public rebirth from a bbc sports broadcaster to a conspiracy proclaimer and researcher etc "

Would be interesting to confirm if he was guided by some local shaman , ie how did the procedure and experience unwind, i havent checked out his stuff enough to know if hes ever publically elaborated on that, but maybe someone reading this has ?



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Re: Philosophers

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Mon 18 Nov 2013, 22:25

I believe he did say that he tried it.

But it was another experience at some ruins in South America that he said he was jolted by earth energies and that created his new path in life.

Interesting thread...
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=165154
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sun 24 Nov 2013, 02:17

Does anyone ever get unsatisfied with what life is giving them,  but they also feel that what they really need is so close , and uugh this life composer delights in keeping it just outside the reach but sometimes it is touchable and even engageable and then life takes on supreme meaning in these moments aagh  had one of those today , reminds me of how all the self torment and bullshit is worth suffering
There are great minds on this forum - thank you for your individual efforts in expression which may mean much more than you could ever imagine to many many people

Footnote - the 14% vino squeezed me a little last night but i always like to see what comes out , a little soppy but there are many layers in here (:
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Wed 18 Dec 2013, 21:00

David Cameron uses the term  " It is Right and proper"  or "It is Right"   very frequently ,  blair also used the phrase "it is right"  with his sneering grin attached to every word,  whenever these politicians speak in modern times,  especially the uk ones in power,  their words have been written for them  with great consideration regarding meaning, intention, subjective effect etc etc

When something is right,  it does not mean its good for all  ,  it just means its right for the correct people using a politica-financo prognosis to determine what is the right action to be implemented to keep them in power and fill their pockets
Its an important distinction that must be recognised when someone is in political power and speaking for the masses although they know their only ever favouring  the select with their polices.

It seems to be a distinction thats been extracted from kantian philosophy although slightly inverted results in that camerons right is good for him and his cronies (enrich themselves) under the intended illusion of helping the mob


The capacity that underlies deciding what is moral is called pure practical reason, which is contrasted with pure reason (the capacity to know without having been shown) and mere practical reason (which allows us to interact with the world in experience). Hypothetical imperatives tell us which means best achieve our ends. They do not, however, tell us which ends we should choose. The typical dichotomy in choosing ends is between ends that are "right" (e.g., helping someone) and those that are "good" (e.g., enriching oneself). Kant considered the "right" superior to the "good"; to him, the "good" was morally irrelevant. In Kant's view, a person cannot decide whether conduct is "right," or moral, through empirical means. Such judgments must be reached a priori, using pure practical reason.
Reason, separate from all empirical experience, can determine the principle according to which all ends can be determined as moral. It is this fundamental principle of moral reason that is known as the categorical imperative. Pure practical reason in the process of determining it dictates what ought to be done without reference to empirical contingent factors. Moral questions are determined independent of reference to the particular subject posing them. It is because morality is determined by pure practical reason rather than particular empirical or sensuous factors that morality is universally valid. This moral universalism has come to be seen as the distinctive aspect of Kant's moral philosophy and has had wide social impact in the legal and political concepts of human rights and equality.
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 26 Apr 2014, 15:09

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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Thu 04 Sep 2014, 23:08

Count Herman Keyserling,  quite an interesting character for sure



…..  In the twenties and early thirties, before it was closed by the Nazis, the School of Wisdom met annually in Darmstadt, Germany. People from around the world would attend these meetings. Many more who could not attend read the transcripts of the speeches given there. They were published worldwide in numerous languages under the name Der Leuchter, meaning The Yearbook. The public sessions of these annual meetings consisted primarily of lectures by several speakers on a general theme, often with opposing points of view. This was all orchestrated by Count Keyserling who gave the opening and closing speeches. Hermann Keyserling referred to this as the "polyphonic style of thought." No one viewpoint or opinion was touted over others. The attendees and readers were encouraged to think for themselves, and not have a strong personality or "Guru" think for them. At the time this was quite a revolutionary view.

When Hermann Keyserling started the School of Wisdom he could easily have set himself up as another Guru, and propagated his own views. He was a famous philosopher whose books were known all over the world. His best selling two volume book, Travel Diary of a Philosopher, can be found in most public libraries. In another of his many books, The World In The Making, (1927) Keyserling speaks of the School of Wisdom in Darmstadt:

"Thus in him who comes to Darmstadt and listens in the right fashion, not in a reflective or critical mood, but adjusted so that the partial perceptions of the truth shall be able to coalesce within him into a higher unity - in him that coalescence will actually take place, even if the process is at first unconscious. Darmstadt does not, then, represent any new abstract theories, but is the concrete experience of a new, higher spiritual reality. It creates in this way that which is the premise for new abstractions. It brings about the transformation in a man whereby he can see the world in another way, with deeper and better insight."

"The School of Wisdom undertakes, by means of the proper psychological methods, to assimilate the impulse of life-renewal on the basis of spirit, into the broad body of historical reality."

"The School of Wisdom was not intended to be a fixed institution, but rather a personal, living instrument of transmission which serves the understanding, and which seeks to transform life on the basis of understanding. For understanding is always a strictly personal undertaking. It can be inducted from one person to another, from one spirit to another, only in a special situation which cannot be repeated, and only in a special manner." - Herman Keyserling……..

Wisdom
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 04:23

QSc and TG , u may find some interesting commentary in this excellent part 1 interview with serrano

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Re: Philosophers

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sat 20 Sep 2014, 22:01

Interesting.

After watching I further suggest my latest posts regarding the work of David Livingstone.
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sun 21 Sep 2014, 01:32

Will do qsc ,shall have some time for longer read this week
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Tue 30 Sep 2014, 02:14

I believe i posted this before but put forth  once more,  the greatest interpretation of platonic works to date , showing the platonic mechanics of spiritual rational thought and the bridges between them , how thought was hijacked by the church in europe and controlled ever since through university ,  during the tightest christian control on rational thinking,  there  were 3 remaining centres of free thought still functioning  ,  athens, alexandria and SYRIA,  today  only one of those remains unhijacked by western pseudo-christian ironfist  =  Syria,  currently under further severe pressures

8 parts -  every word must be listened to and digested as they all important to the overall enlightenment


ANCIENTTRUTHS
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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sat 20 Dec 2014, 16:26

Cant recall if i posted earlier but Excellent interview

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Re: Philosophers

Post  KapitanScarlet on Thu 04 Jun 2015, 21:52

I wish uri was still around, id like to spoon feed this down her mouth

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Re: Philosophers

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