Etymological Studies

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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sun 29 Aug 2010, 12:43

The Wyvern

Wyvern speared by angels Liber Floridus, 1448

A wyvern or wivern (pronounced /ˈwaɪvərn/) is a legendary winged reptilian creature with a dragon's head, the hindquarters of a snake or lizard with two legs or none, and a barbed tail. The wyvern was often found in mediaeval heraldry[1]. The word is derived from Middle English wyvere, from Old North French wivre "viper".[2] Wyverns are mentioned in Dante's Inferno (Canto XVII) as the body for one of his creatures in hell.
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Sun 05 Jun 2011, 17:07

During her descent to the underworld Goddess Inanna must pass through 7 gates,
at each gate, Inanna was required to shed a piece of her identity as a Goddess.

From the crown downwards....until she stands naked before Ereškigal
who then demonstrates her power by first killing and then resurrecting Inanna.

Could the 7 gates be in reference to the 7 chakras?

The Mesopotamian people believed that the ghost (spirit of the dead living in the Underworld) [gidim] were created at the time of death, and then left the body and descended to the underworld [Irkalla]. The ghost retained the personality of the deceased. This is different from the belief of some other cultures were the ghost is a part of the person from time of birth that survives their death.

...Inanna returns to the world of the living but must leave a replacement while she is amongst the living...(the ghost of Inanna's last embodyment?)

The seasons are a worldy representation of this cycle and Easter is the celebration of Inanna's rebirth.




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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Mon 06 Jun 2011, 23:40

During her descent to the underworld Goddess Inanna must pass through 7 gates,
at each gate, Inanna was required to shed a piece of her identity as a Goddess.

From the crown downwards....until she stands naked before Ereškigal
who then demonstrates her power by first killing and then resurrecting Inanna.

Could the 7 gates be in reference to the 7 chakras?

Sounds Credible
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Tue 07 Jun 2011, 13:29

Hi Kapis,

I didn't quite know how to interpret that "ghost created at death" part of Sumerian scritpture. LOL

But I found out that in some myths, the doppelgänger is a version of the Ankou, a personification of death. But I guess this is not to be confused with ones subtle body.

The all seeing eye/pineal gland is operating from the subtle (auric) body.

Sumerian word ASAR translates: all-powerful, awesome, all-seeing eye.

Osiris, principal god of Egypt, judge of the dead, from L. Osiris, from Gk., and lo and behold..

is named "ASAR" in Egyptian. No matter where I look, everything turns Sumerian.

Osiris was written with the hieroglyphs of a throne and an eye. A Sumerian god local to Eridu is also called Asar and his name is written in Sumerian (kuneiform) with the symbol for a throne.


Then there is the Lithuanian word aušrà which translates to "dawn achieving order"...
sometimes also associated with the dawn of a new day.

In the Nordic tradition Asar is plural of Æsir, so it might indicate the final battle for all Asar,

that is Ragnarök, the "final destiny of the gods."

In stanza 39 of the Poetic Edda poem Lokasenna, and in the Prose Edda, the form ragnarök(k)r appears, rök(k)r meaning "twilight." It has often been suggested that this indicates a misunderstanding or a learned reinterpretation of the original form ragnarök. Haraldur Bernharðsson argues instead that the words ragnarök and ragnarökkr are closely related, etymologically and semantically, and suggests a meaning of "renewal of the divine powers."

The German translation of Ragnarök(kr) "Götterdämmerung" means literally "twilight of the gods"..

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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Thu 09 Jun 2011, 22:28

The Mesopotamian people believed that the ghost (spirit of the dead living in the Underworld) [gidim] were created at the time of death, and then left the body and descended to the underworld [Irkalla]. The ghost retained the personality of the deceased.

Its as good a theory as any other one and could explain people talking to the dead in seance or dreams, although, that, can also as always be counterpunched as overactive imagination , unless the otherworldly communication leads to something tangible in earthly awareness which can dismiss such prosecution

Your mentioning of Inanna led me into the sexual historic realms and it seems highly probable that the christian sledgehammer decimated every source of recorded sexual knowledge that it could hunt out in any culture it infiltrated so that one of its main sources of controlling the consciousness of the masses was / is ....Make them be ignorant and fear their own "mystical" sexual energy (mystical being an unknown force that can be psychally sensed at a level preceding sensible conceptualization and then articulation , without which their development of such force is stagnated or worse misdirected by devious doctrine into a negative discharge for their self) so that they look outside themselves to established doctrine for directions to babysit the fear

There is still much to learn about this pineal gland i think



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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Sun 01 Jul 2012, 01:36

The Slavic Vampir

Slavic spiritualism

Although many cultures possess revenant superstitions comparable to the Eastern European vampire, the Slavic vampire is the revenant superstition that pervades popular culture's concept of vampire. The roots of vampire belief in Slavic culture are based to a large extent in the spiritual beliefs and practices of pre-Christianized Slavic peoples and their understanding of life after death. Despite a lack of pre-Christian Slavic writings describing the details of the "Old Religion", many pagan spiritual beliefs and rituals have been sustained by Slavic peoples even after their lands were Christianized. Examples of such beliefs and practices include ancestor worship, household spirits, and beliefs about the soul after death. The origins of vampire beliefs in Slavic regions can be traced to the complex structure of Slavic spiritualism.

Demons and spirits served important functions in pre-industrial Slavic societies and were considered to be very interactive in the lives and domains of humans. Some spirits were benevolent and could be helpful in human tasks, others were harmful and often destructive. Examples of such spirits are Domovoi, Rusalka, Vila, Kikimora, Poludnitsa, and Vodyanoy. These spirits were also considered to be derived from ancestors or certain deceased humans. Such spirits could appear at will in various forms including that of different animals or human form. Some of these spirits could also participate in malevolent activity to harm humans, such as drowning humans, obstructing the harvest, or sucking the blood of livestock and sometimes humans. Hence, the Slavs were obliged to appease these spirits to prevent the spirits from their potential for erratic and destructive behaviour.

Common Slavic belief indicates a stark distinction between soul and body. The soul is not considered to be perishable. The Slavs believed that upon death the soul would go out of the body and wander about its neighbourhood and workplace for 40 days before moving on to an eternal afterlife. Because of this, it was considered necessary to leave a window or door open in the house for the soul to pass through at its leisure. During this time the soul was believed to have the capability of re-entering the corpse of the deceased. Much like the spirits mentioned earlier, the passing soul could either bless or wreak havoc on its family and neighbours during its 40 days of passing. Upon an individual's death, much stress was placed on proper burial rites to ensure the soul's purity and peace as it separated from the body. The death of an unbaptized child, a violent or an untimely death, or the death of a grievous sinner (such as a sorcerer or murderer) were all grounds for a soul to become unclean after death. A soul could also be made unclean if its body were not given a proper burial. Alternatively, a body not given a proper burial could be susceptible to possession by other unclean souls and spirits. Slavs feared unclean souls because of their potential for taking vengeance.

From these deeply implicated beliefs pertaining to death and the soul derives the invention of the Slavic concept of vampir. A vampire is the manifestation of an unclean spirit possessing a decomposing body. This undead creature is considered to be vengeful and jealous towards the living and needing the blood of the living to sustain its body's existence.Although this concept of vampire exists in slightly deviating forms throughout Slavic countries and some of their non-Slavic neighbours, it is possible to trace the development of vampire belief to Slavic spiritualism pre-existing Christianity in Slavic regions.

Definitions of their entitys

DOMOVOI
RUSALKA
VEELA
KIKIMORA
POLUDNITSA
VODYANOY


Psychodynamic understanding

In his 1931 treatise On the Nightmare, Welsh psychoanalyst Ernest Jones noted that vampires are symbolic of several unconscious drives and defence mechanisms. Emotions such as love, guilt, and hate fuel the idea of the return of the dead to the grave. Desiring a reunion with loved ones, mourners may project the idea that the recently dead must in return yearn the same. From this arises the belief that folkloric vampires and revenants visit relatives, particularly their spouses, first.[134] In cases where there was unconscious guilt associated with the relationship, however, the wish for reunion may be subverted by anxiety. This may lead to repression, which Sigmund Freud had linked with the development of morbid dread.Jones surmised in this case the original wish of a (sexual) reunion may be drastically changed: desire is replaced by fear; love is replaced by sadism, and the object or loved one is replaced by an unknown entity. The sexual aspect may or may not be present. Some modern critics have proposed a simpler theory: People identify with immortal vampires because, by so doing, they overcome, or at least temporarily escape from, their fear of dying.

The innate sexuality of bloodsucking can be seen in its intrinsic connection with cannibalism and folkloric one with incubus-like behaviour. Many legends report various beings draining other fluids from victims, an unconscious association with semen being obvious. Finally Jones notes that when more normal aspects of sexuality are repressed, regressed forms may be expressed, in particular sadism; he felt that oral sadism is integral in vampiric behaviour

Political interpretation

The reinvention of the vampire myth in the modern era is not without political overtones.[139] The aristocratic Count Dracula, alone in his castle apart from a few demented retainers, appearing only at night to feed on his peasantry, is symbolic of the parasitic Ancien regime. In his entry for "Vampires" in the Dictionnaire philosophique (1764), Voltaire notices how the end of the 18th century coincided with the decline of the folkloric belief in the existence of vampires but that now "there were stock-jobbers, brokers, and men of business, who sucked the blood of the people in broad daylight; but they were not dead, though corrupted. These true suckers lived not in cemeteries, but in very agreeable palaces". Marx similarly famously defined capital as "dead labour which, vampire-like, lives only by sucking living labour, and lives the more, the more labour it sucks".In Das Kapital Marx repeatedly refers to capital as a vampire, because of its monstrous metabolism: according to the German philosopher and revolutionary, in fact, capital is capable at once to suck living labour out of the workers and to transform them in an integral part of itself (variable capital). Werner Herzog, in his Nosferatu the Vampyre, gives this political interpretation an extra ironic twist when protagonist Jonathon Harker, a middle-class solicitor, becomes the next vampire; in this way the capitalist bourgeois becomes the next parasitic class
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Fri 22 Feb 2013, 01:44

Chi = the greek letter X = indicating criss cross
Chiastic = a means of expression which both conceals and nourishes deeper thinking
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Sun 24 Feb 2013, 15:48

About the linguistics of Vampyr, in it's oldest form: "upir" it can be traced as uber

a Turk word for witch (Kazan Tatar ubyr "witch")

even the indo-german word über is connected: über-human

with the meaning of 'human with super-natural/transcendetal abilitites'.

In my opinion the Vampyr is an ancient [pre-christian] Shaman from the Black Sea region [Turkey and Ukraine]

all along the Danube river [South East Europe].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Danubemap.jpg


The acquisition of shamanic abilities was often the result of serious illness, sensory deprivation, near-death experiences and the like. Shamanic initiation rituals typically involved the theme of suffering, death and rebirth. The initiate would often undergo a symbolic death; Frazer (2) cites several examples in which the potential shaman is taken away from the community and left in "the wilderness", the villagers being sometimes shown a dummy and told that it is his body - then, some time later, he returns reborn as a shaman.

During the time away from the village, the initiate searches for inspiration or a vision brought about by fasting or sensory deprivation. Eliade (3) explains that he might experience visions in which he is dismembered by spirits or is fed on blood. Initiatory visions may also involve a journey to the land of the dead, or meeting with dead ancestors. We might say, then, that the shaman has 'experienced' death and symbolically risen from his grave.

Study of the vampire tradition yields clues to the shamanic nature of the vampire; for example, Murgoci wrote that: "People destined to become vampires after death may be able in life to send out their souls, and even their bodies, to wander at cross-roads with reanimated corpses ... it merges into the ordinary witch or wizard, who can meet with other witches or wizards either in the body or as a spirit". (4)

We see here the clear link between vampyrs and the 'out-of-body flight' of the shaman.
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Mon 25 Feb 2013, 03:02

We see here the clear link between vampyrs and the 'out-of-body flight' of the shaman.

interesting Sputnik, and heres another thought

The basic conditioned person today is a slave to the and their physical , although the more self willed can impose discipline on their physical and actually change its shape = minor magic
A few levels beyond that, maybe certain people can impose discipline on theirs and others spirits (conducted through the subconscious circuit) which then filters out into the physical at a later date with only certain people knowing what truly seeded this change

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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Mon 25 Feb 2013, 21:48

I find it pretty peculiar that the christian faith believes in the rising of the dead in the form of the "resurrection"
and the drinking of the blood of Jesus Christ on sunday in churches around the world in the guise of wine.

Wow.......is that what it is.....?











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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Thu 28 Feb 2013, 23:20

I find it pretty peculiar that the christian faith believes in the rising of the dead in the form of the "resurrection"
and the drinking of the blood of Jesus Christ on sunday in churches around the world in the guise of wine.

slight elaboration sputnik to kickstart my exact understanding of what you are isolating ?
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Mon 04 Mar 2013, 07:46

the baffling correlation between the vampire lore and the christian faith thru ritual and meaning is staggering.

the "drinking of blood" and being "raised from the dead"...living eternally, I hope you get the gist of it.

Now if you consider the possibility that the vampire lore is part of an ancient shaman practice it might all make sense, no?

The only difference is that the christians only believe in it's theory but demonize the actual act if practiced independantly.

It's as if the faith encapsules some ancient knowledge yet tells you only to smell it but not taste it...
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Mon 04 Mar 2013, 12:18

The only difference is that the christians only believe in it's theory but demonize the actual act if practiced independantly.

It's as if the faith encapsules some ancient knowledge yet tells you only to smell it but not taste it...

thats what i thought you were pointing at sputnik, look but dont touch (: thx for the clarified elaborate, in a world that moves away from clarification , its always a pleasure when someone can make their point clear and definitive
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Mon 04 Mar 2013, 22:40

Exactly, now..how come christians like to drink the blood of Jesus in a communion fashion to raise from the dead..in the hope of salvation ... all so confusing, so what does it mean to them? Do they know?
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Tue 05 Mar 2013, 14:09

so what does it mean to them? Do they know?

there may be a definitive ritualistic energy operating occult meaning for a certain few, i must look into that later
but for the general hail mary , you could line them up on a sunday an feed them hay dressed up in a religious procedure and they would be just as happy , as long as they "think" their doing the godly thing , thats as far as their internal processor demand system has developed too, essentially still stuck in their school teacher mode of operandus
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Tue 05 Mar 2013, 22:58

In observing Communion we are remembering Christ and all that He has done for us in his life, death and resurrection:
And when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, "This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me." 1 Corinthians 11:24 (NIV)
When observing Communion we take time to examine ourselves:
A man ought to examine himself before he eats of the bread and drinks of the cup. 1 Corinthians 11:28 (NIV)
In observing Communion we are proclaiming His death until He comes. It is, then, a statement of faith:
For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes. 1 Corinthians 11:26 (NIV)
When we observe Communion we show our participation in the body of Christ. His life becomes our life and we become members of each other:
Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ? And is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ? Because there is one loaf, we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf. 1 Corinthians 10:16-17 (NIV)


While they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to his disciples, saying, "Take and eat; this is my body." Then he took the cup, gave thanks and offered it to them, saying, "Drink from it, all of you. This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins." Matthew 26:26-28 (NIV)

While they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to his disciples, saying, "Take it; this is my body." Then he took the cup, gave thanks and offered it to them, and they all drank from it. "This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many." Mark 14:22-24 (NIV)

And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me." In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you." Luke 22:19-20 (NIV)

Is not the cup of thanksgiving for which we give thanks a participation in the blood of Christ? And is not the bread that we break a participation in the body of Christ? Because there is one loaf, we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf. 1 Corinthians 10:16-17 (NIV)

And when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, "This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me." In the same way, after supper he took the cup, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me." For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes. 1 Corinthians 11:24-26 (NIV)

It seems for the more seriously commited, Its really all about Transubstantiation Cool

"Transubstantiation" is the official Roman Catholic concept referring to the change that takes place during the sacrament of Holy Communion (Eucharist). This change involves the substances of bread and wine being turned miraculously into the substance of Christ himself. The underlying essence of these elements is changed, and they retain only the appearance, taste, and texture of bread and wine. Catholic doctrine holds that the Godhead is indivisible, so every particle or drop thus changed is wholly identical in substance with the divinity, body, and blood of the Savior.

But this one could easily be interpreted through a vampiric concept

Jesus said to them, "I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day." John 6:53-54 (NIV)
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Wed 06 Mar 2013, 16:01

Jesus said to them, "I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day." John 6:53-54 (NIV)

we don't know if Jesus really said that....

The problem I see with this version is simple....why wait until "the last day" ?

The last day before immortality?

Why not now? or next year or at least in this life?

Or are we even inheriting "eternal life" all along and we must only preserve our nature?

How is it possible that Spirit can reincarnate and take posession of a body?

Does blood exist for the body or does the body exist for the blood?

Pythagoras said that the "gods are innocent concerning the illnesses of mankind", sickness and pain of the body are the results of imbalance and overindulgence, and also that our food is our medicine.

Bechamp believed that there are micro-elements in the blood which he called Microzymas which do not die when the body of any biological system dies. These micro-elements NEVER die, and he believed they are present in all blood stains, even if thousands of years old. They are immortal and undestructable, and he believed that they are the key connection between animated and non-animated matter.

Under special circumstances these Microzymas could animate themselves in Bacteria which ferment. As a consequence this would mean that ALL sicknesses have their origin in the internal body or to be precise in the blood.

Then came Pasteur who fucked up all science by insisting on blood being sterile in nature, which of course is total bullshit. He also believed that all microbes are static, never change and each one causing a certain type of disease. Today we know that this is rubbish but Pasteur is still being taught in schools.

Last but not least we have the scientific studies of Enderlein. He was a genius but nobody cares. He has proven that our blood has formed a symbiotic relationship with a certain fungus that produces the thrombocytes that are of key importance to the function of blood coagulation. He also prooved that blood is never sterile, developed a different kind of microscope for his blood studies...one that modern medicine ignores to this day..

But back to my correlation...between christian superstition and their "expressionist" schizophrenic tale of vamyprism...

Let's just say the heart is not a mechanical tool that "pumps" our blood thru the body, rather the pulse comes from another source and instead the blood is getting "energized" inside the heart while flowing thru it...and let's say the egg was before the chicken, because though a chicken egg doesn't have yet a heart it still "pulsates" all the fluids around including blood thru the whole developing body of a embyonic chicken. This can actually easily be observed under an ordinary microsope.

The first organ that indeed develops in a mamal and most other biological entities is the heart...but it is not responsible for the blood flow [lets not get into too many details here, lets just say it is so]...

Then blood plays a far more prominent role than science have us believe.

By the way, I would not recommend people to drink blood of another creature, nor would I recommend people "blood transfusions" unless it is absolutely vital for ones ultimate survival...as today blood is quite "diseased".

Another interesting aspect of blood is the fact that there are different typs of it in humans. They basically are from different times of our evolution and correlate to the particular eating habits in those days. Even the hormons of people of different blood types are different in essence and distribution.

Basically all of this has been known about blood since pre-historic times.

Blood was believed by tribal cultures to contain an important "particle" of the soul. Inuits and other ancient tribal people believe that killing animals for consumption must be done in a fashion that "releases the souls" in a acceptable fashion. Jewish kosher tradition also insists on strict rules concerning the preparation of meat & milk and the complete draining of the blood of animals killed for consumption can be found in almost all cultures since ancient times.

During some period of our evolutionary development the blood of a brave enemy or admired animal was drunk to bestow upon the drinker the positive attributes of the vanquished man or creature. The blood of a sacrificed animal was drunk in order to produce a communion with the gods. This practice dates back to ancient Greece [and can also be found around the world in socalled "primitive cultures"] and therefor the idea of "communion" is not really a "christian" invention.

Nowadays one can have communion with bovine spongiform encephalopathy [BSE]! So much for that...

What is not clear to me is why christians think they must [even if only symbolically] drink blood and eat the body of another human, in this case Jesus, to achieve "resurrection". Maybe they just got fooled? Who knows..

The resurrection theme has more to do with a certain type of shaman who died, yet raises [himself] from the dead -- and the figure of Jesus discribes such a shaman. With death I don't mean the socalled invention of brain-dead [they needed such a vague thing to justify the practice of organ transplant...but organs for a transplant can only be taken from a body that is still ALIVE, hence a brain is "officially declared dead" before the organs are being taken out of a body...to be implanted into another body...but the "donation-body" was definetly still alive when it was salvaged].

For me death means when the heart stops beating and nothing else.

When somebody dies [and their heart stops beating] for minutes or hours and then raises from the dead - now that is an awesome feat isn't it...

We could say it's a miracle. And I happen to believe in miracles cyclops but only if they are of the actual kind if you know what I mean - there is a little Jesus in all of us, so I woudn't recommend to wait for the very last day.

As the natives say, if it's a good day to die [so be it], but if it's not a good day to die one better raise from death and re-join the living until a good day arrives...attitude & timing is everything!






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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Thu 07 Mar 2013, 00:17

Some head scratching inquirys , personally i believe in re-incarnation at present
i concur with pythag on the ilnesses and food but with the developed personal and social consciousness and subconsciousness playing a far stronger role than our scientists have ever dared consider
Very interesting comments on the blood and worth corelating to steiners blood expose posted somewhere here , but a specific fascinating area of blood is for sure the menstrual cycle which happens i guess against womens wills ? maybe a female can comment on this phenomena more realistically regarding its effect on her and any mens around her realitys ?

So i dug up some comments on the menstrual blood and this first piece is quite of interest on the "lilith aspect" any experience of this sputnik ? (:


To fully understand the rape of Eve one must be familiar with the legends of Lilith and the Fall of Man. Briefly according to Hebrew rabbinic writings Lilith was the first wife of Adam, created by God as twins joined together. Lilith demanded equality with Adam, especially during sexual intercourse not always being beneath. When Adam refused to her demands Lilith hastily left him fleeing to the Red Sea where, according to other legends, she copulated with Satan begetting the demonic Djinn or one hundred babies a day. God sent three angles to fetch her, but Lilith refused to return. Thus God gave Adam the docile Eve. But when Lilith saw Adam with Eve she remembered the Holy Beautiful One and rushed back to take her place, only it was too late, God had locked her out by the cherubim.

In the legend of the Fall of Man one sees Eve being tempted by the serpent. According to Christian belief the serpent was Satan in disguise; another name for Satan is Samael, Lilith's demonic lover. The Kabbalists carried this lore further by saying that menstrual blood was a curse upon women descending from Eve's sexual union with Lilith in the guise of Samael. When Lilith had seen Samael in his serpentine form seducing Eve she became envious and entered the act herself. The Eve's menstrual blood became the actual 'filth and the impure seed' of Samael. This follows the rabbinic lore that Lilith in Serpent form was able to seduce Eve because of the inherent lustfulness and weakness of women. In turn Eve seduced Adam during her menses. Once Adam defiled himself through this forbidden act, Lilith became strong 'in her husks' and was able to come to him against his will to steal his seed to engender many demons, spirits, and Lilin.

The importance of the above Kabbalistic myth is that it shows the Kabbalists not only accepted the Hebrew prohibition that men should not have sexual relationship with a woman during her menses but also not during her purification period lasting seven days afterwards as written in the Old Testament (Lev. 18:19) and the Midrash, but they presented a reason for the prohibition. They went further than the Bible which just states God's prohibition which simply states that man should not let menstrual blood touch him with no explanation. There was no explanation needed for most Jews since God had stated it. The Kabbalists not only presented an explanation for the prohibition but also described the occult power thought to be in menstrual blood of menstruation.
It is recognized that for many modern readers the above prohibition seems absurd and foolish. But let this author assure you that it was just a few years ago, if not currently, that Christian mothers were advising their sons and daughters not to have sexual intercourse during the wife's menstruation, the prohibition rooted deep and well. Furthermore, such lore should not be openly rejected as meaningless but studied for its deeper occult meaning. The Kabbalists believed that Eve's menstrual blood was the seed of Samael in his serpentine form indicates a strong link between menstrual blood and Kundalini energy, which is always characterized as serpentine. The belief is carried further: the authority which Eve exerted over Adam indicates the belief in the power of her blood, and shows her (women's) immense potency, thus women can compel men to act against their will. Therefore, it might be said, this persuasive ability or gift was given by Lilith through Samael to Eve. It is no wonder that the ancient rabbis called this gift a curse. The curse or gift to all mankind also was the birth of Cain, Cain of gnosis.

As it would be expected the rabbis would consider this a curse. Their attitude was certainly carried over into the Christian religion and continued for centuries. It has just been in recent years that women have made any headway within the Christian Church, mainly in Protestant denominations. Of course, this was the main goal of Christianity, destroy the Goddess religion. Many believe this goal was partially interrupted by Lilith, the sexual love aspect of the Great Mother who exerts so much power.

Such power is of both a magical and sexual nature. It has always been present in alchemy as the term menstruum, meaning menstrual blood. Its use in alchemy is associated with its occult meanings, both life and death. The occult virtues for menstrual blood have completely different sets of associations in Western occultism from the blood within the body. Menstrual blood while in the body nourished and empowered, but once it flowed out it was almost universally believed to sterilize, destroy, and kill. According to some these characteristics naturally made it the blood of Lilith. Throughout history menstrual blood has been described as having magical properties rendering it serviceable for many uses which range from deadly to useful purposes. Two noted authors were the Roman Pliny the Elder and Agrippa.

Pliny the Elder devoted two chapters of his Natural History describing the dreadful powers of menstrual blood. Agrippa mentioned many in his treatment of sorceries. Agrippa's comments are curious as he gives several examples as to how menstrual blood is harmful to agriculture: it sours new wine, and if it touches the vine it spoils it; by it very touch it makes all plants and trees barren; and it burns herbs and makes fruit fall from trees. He continues giving other examples of the ill effects of menstrual blood but by contrast medieval peasants thought it could nourish and fertilize. Some believed a woman during menstruation could protect fields by walking through it or exposing her genitals. Other women carried seeds to fields in rags stained by menstrual blood, a continuation of the custom of Eleusinian fertility.

One has to wonder who is right, Pliny the Elder and Agrippa or the peasant woman? From a brief observation one would tend to answer the women. Both Pliny the Elder and Agrippa were men of letters, although no doubt both had observed nature and Agrippa, although he practiced occultism, had connections to the Roman Catholic Church and its anti-natural views. However, the peasant women had lived the natural experience; they knew what it was to plant and sow. Most probably they had planted menstrual-blood drenched seeds many times thinking they produced better and knowing they caused no ill effects. The women most liking saw female animals menstruate and knew it caused no harm. To them, menstruation was a natural feminine process as it had been to ancient pagan women observing the Eleusinian Mysteries, perhaps some of this belief still lived.

Some call menstrual blood the blood of Lilith because they believed it had power of both life and death, life within the body to nourish the fetus and death when it flows out; therefore Lilith is mistress of childbirth. This blood is also link to the Moon as the menstrual cycle closely corresponds to the lunar cycle, therefore associated with Lilith, Hecate, Kali, and other lunar goddesses of destruction.

The rape of Eve and the story of Lilith coincide when describing the derogation of women among past Judeo-Christian clergy. Both were degraded by God and his all-male clergy followed his example. But both reinstated themselves becoming a feminine force to be reckoned with: Lilith by going to the Red Sea, taking her demon lover Samael, begetting demons, and participating in the rape of Eve; and Eve when she tempted Adam to have sexual intercourse with her during her menses. All such activity interrupted God's plan for his 'perfect man' and 'obedient woman,' and gave women equality with men. By Adam defiling himself women gained the opportunity of being able to make men do things against their will. In this sense Lilith and Eve are comparable to the Persian sea-goddess Tiamat who was to be a dutiful deity after her husband Apsu was killed. But unlike chaotic Tiamat neither Lilith nor Eve were killed and continue ravaging chaos on the world when fighting for justice.

Many women possess the Lilith aspect of the feminine personality, Samael in men. This is an personality aspect which represents the witch's knife giving her the determination and strength to depart or cut away from taking the sheltered and traditional path of womanhood, a path usually male and power driven. The nontraditional path leads its feminine traveler on a very different road than the one traveled by the average woman, often at first to isolation. In the feeling of complete aloneness, and sometimes shame, the person asks, "What have I done?" But such isolation and shame when accepted as challenges can issue forth fortitude. After healing oneself from wounds inflicted by ordinary society the woman decides whether she is going to repeatedly accept those wounds or fight back. If her Lilith aspect fully develops, she fights back by deciding the best ways of meeting numerous situations. She uses her knife to destroy injurious situations, and defend herself. Performing her tasks may by slow and arduous but she seeks self-equality and justice. She seeks selfhood as Lilith did when storming heaven's gate.

And more interesting is commentarys here on the perceptions of holy blood and which concludes with a final sentence that may point out a poignant observation


From the earliest human cultures, the mysterious magic of creation was thought to reside in the blood women gave forth in apparent harmony with the moon, and which was occasionally retained in the womb to 'coagulate' into a baby. Men regarded this blood with holy dread, as the life essence, inexplicably shed without pain, wholly foreign to male experience.

Most words for menstruation also meant such things as incomprehensible, supernatural, sacred, spirit, deity. Like the Latin sacred, old Arabian words for 'pure' and 'impure' both applied to menstrual blood and to that only. The Maoris stated explicitly that human souls are made of menstrual blood, which when retained in the womb 'assumes human form and grows into a man.' Africans said menstrual blood is 'congealed to fashion a man'. Aristotle said the same: human life is made of 'coagulum' of menstrual blood. Pliny called menstrual blood the 'material substance of generation', capable of forming 'a curd, which afterwards in process of time quickeneth and groweth to the form of a body.' This primitive notion of the prenatal function of menstrual blood was still taught in European medical schools up to the 18th century.

Basic ideas about menstrual blood came from the Hindu theory that as the Great Mother creates, her substances become thickened and forms a curd or clot; solid matter is produced as a 'crust'. This was the way she gave birth to the cosmos, and women employ the same method on a smaller scale. According to Daustinius, 'the fruit in the womb is nourished by the mother's blood....The menstruum does not fail the fruit for nourishment, till it at the proper time comes to the light of the day.'

Indians of South America said all mankind was made of 'moon blood' in the beginning. The same idea prevailed in ancient Mesopotamia, where the Great Goddess Ninhursag made mankind out of clay and infused with her "blood of life." Under her alternate name of Mammetun or Aruru the Great, the Potter, she taught women to form clay dolls and smear them with menstrual blood as a conception- charm, a piece of magic that underlay the name of Adam, from the feminine adamah, meaning "bloody clay," though scholars more delicately translated it "red earth."

The Bible's story of Adam was lifted from an older female-oriented creation myth recounting the creation of man from clay and moonblood. So was the Koran's creation story, which said Allah "made man out of flowing blood"; but in pre-Islamic Arabia, Allah was the Goddess of creation, Al-Lat. The Romans also had traces of the original creation myth. Plutarch said man was made of earth, but the power that made a human body grow was the moon, source of menstrual blood.

The lives of the very gods were dependent on the miraculous power of menstrual blood. In Greece it was euphemistically called the "supernatural red wine" given to the gods by Mother Hera in her virgin form, as Hebe. The root myths of Hinduism reveal the nature of this 'wine'. At one time all gods recognized the supremacy of the Great Mother, manifesting herself as the spirit of creation (Kali-Maya). She 'invited them to bath in the bloody flow of her womb and to drink of it; and the gods, in holy communion, drank of the fountain of life -- (hic est sanguis meus!) -- and bathed in it, and rose blessed to the heavens'. To this day, clothes allegedly stained with the GOddess's menstrual blood are greatly prized as healing charms. W.R. Smith reported that the value of the gum acacia as an amulet "is connected to the idea that it is menstruous blood, i.e., that the tree is a woman." For religious ceremonies, Australian aborigines painted their sacred stones, churingas, and themselves with red orche, declaring that it was really women's menstrual blood.

The esoteric secret of the gods was that their mystical powers of longevity, authority, and creativity came from the same female essence. The Norse god Thor for example reached the magic land of enlightenment and eternal life by bathing in a river filled with the menstrual blood of 'giantesses' -- that is of the Primal Matriarchs, "Powerful Ones" who governed the elder gods before Odin brought his 'Asians' (Aesir) out of the East. Odin acquired supremacy by stealing and drinking the 'wise blood' from the triple cauldron in the womb of the Mother-Earth, the same Triple Goddess known as Kali-Maya in the southeast Asia.

Odin's theft of menstrual magic paralleled that of Indra, who stole the ambrosia of immortality in the same way. Indian myth called the sacred fluid Soma -- in Greek, "the body", because the word's eastern root referred to a mystical substance of the body. Soma was the object of so much holy dread that its interpretations were many.

Soma was produced by the churning of the primal sea (Kali's 'ocean of blood' or sometimes 'sea of milk'). Or Soma was secreted by the Moon-Cow. Or Soma was carried in the 'white pot' (belly) of Mohini the Enchantress. Or the source of Soma was the moon. Or from Soma all the gods were born. Or Soma was the secret name of the Mother Goddess and the active part of the 'soul of the world'.

Soma was drunk by priests at sacrificial ceremonies and mixed with milk as a healing charm; therefore it was not milk. Soma was especially revered on Somvara, Monday, the day of the moon. In an ancient ceremony called Soma-vati, women of Maharastra circumambulated the sacred female-symbolic fig tree whenever the new moon fell on a Monday.

Some myths claimed the Goddess under her name of Lakshmi, "Fortune" or "Sovereignty", gave Soma to Indra to make him king of the gods. His wisdom, power, and curiously feminine capacity for pregnancy, came from Lakshmi's mystic drink, 'of which none tastes who dwells on earth.' On drinking it straight from the Goddess, Indra became like her, the Mount of Paradise with its four rivers, "many-hued" like the Goddess's rainbow veils, rich in cattle and fruiting vegetation. The Goddess's blood became his wisdom. Similarly, Greeks believed the wisdom of men or god was centered in his blood, the soul-stuff given by his mother.

Egyptian pharaohs became divine by ingesting 'the blood of Isis,' a soma-like ambrosia called sa. Its hieroglyphic sign was the same as the sign of the vulva, a yonic loop like the one on the ankh or Cross of Life. Painted red, this loop signified the female genital and the Gate of Heaven. Amulets buried with the dead specifically prayed Isis to deify the deceased with her magic blood. A special amulet called the Tjet represented Isis's vulva and was formed of red substance - jasper, carnelian, red porcelain, red glass, or red wood. This amulet was said to carry the redeeming power of the blood of Isis.

The same elixir of immortality received the name of amrita in Persia. Sometimes it was called the Milk of the Mother Goddess, sometimes a fermented drink, sometimes sacred blood. Always it was associated with the moon. "Dew and rain becoming vegetable sap, sap becoming the milk of the cow, and the milk then becoming converted into blood; -- Amrita, water, sap, milk, and blood represent but differing states of the one elixir. The vessel or cup of this immortal fluid is the moon."

Celtic kings became gods by drinking the 'red mead' dispensed by the Fairy Queen, Mab, whose name was formerly Medhbh or "mead." Thus she gave a drink of herself. Lakshmi. A Celtic name of this fluid was dergflaith, meaning either "red ale" or "red sovereignty." In Celtic Britain, to be stained with red meant to be chosen by the Goddess as king. Celtic ruadh meant both "red" and "royal."

The same blood color implied apotheosis after death. The pagan paradise or Fairyland was at the uterine center of the earth, site of the magic Fountain of Life. An old manuscript in the British Museum said the dying -and -resurrected Phoenix lives there forever. The central Holy Mountain or mons veneris contains both male and female symbols: the Tree of Life and the Fountain of Eternal Youth, the latter obviously menstrual, as it was said to overflow once every lunar month.

Medieval churchmen insisted that the communion wine drunk by witches was menstrual blood, and they may have been right. The famous wizard Thomas Rhymer joined a witch cult under the tutelage of the Fairy Queen, who told him she had "a bottle of claret wine here in her lap," and invited him to lay his head in her lap. Claret was the traditional drink of the kings and also a synonym for blood; its name literally meant 'enlightenment.' There was a saying, "the man in the moon drinks claret," connected with the idea that the wine represented lunar blood.

Medieval romance and the courtly-love movement, later related to the witch cults, were strongly influenced by the Tantric tradition, in which menstrual blood was indeed the wine of poets and sages. It is still specified in the Left Hand Rite of Tantra that the priestess impersonating the goddess must be menstruating, and after contact with her a man may perform rites that will make him "a great poet, a Lord of the World" who travels on elephant-back like a rajah.

In ancient societies both east and west, menstrual blood carried the spirit of sovereign authority because it was the medium of transmission of the life of clan or tribe. Among the Ashanti, girl children are still more prized than boys because a girl is the carrier of "blood" (mogya). The concept is also clearly defined in India, where menstrual blood is known as the Kula flower or Kula nectar, which has an intimate connection with the life of the family. When a girl first menstruates she is said to have 'borne the flower'. The corresponding English word flower has the significant literal meaning of 'that which flows'.

The Bible also calls menstrual blood the flower (Leviticus 15:24), precursor of the fruit of the womb (a child). As any flower mysteriously contained its future fruit, so uterine blood was the moon-flower supposed to contain the soul of future generations. This was a central idea in the matrilineal concept of the clan.

The Chinese religion of Tao, "the Way", taught Tantric doctrines later supplanted by patriarchial-ascetic Confucianism. Taoists said a man could become immortal (or at least long-lived) by absorbing menstrual blood, called red yin juice, from a woman's Mysterious Gateway, otherwise known as the Grotto of the White Tiger, symbol of life-giving female energy. Chinese sages called this red juice the essence of Mother Earth, the yin principal that gives life to all things. They claimed the Yellow Emperor became a god by absorbing the yin juice of twelve hundred women.

A Chinese myth said the Moon-goddess Chang-O, who controlled menstruation, was offended by male jealousy of her powers. She left her husband, who quarreled with her because she had all the elixir of immortality, and he had none, and was resentful. She turned her back on him and went to live in the moon forever, in much the same way Lilith left Adam to live at the 'Red Sea'. Chang-O forbade men to attend Chinese moon festivals, which were afterward celebrated by women only, at the full moon of the autumnal equinox.

The Hebrew word for blood, dam, means 'mother' or 'woman' in other Indo-European languages (e,g. dam, damsel, madam, la dama, dame) and also "the curse" (damn). The Sumaeriean Great Mother represented maternal blood and bore names like Dam-kina, Damgalnunna. From her belly flowed the four rivrres of Paradise, sometimes called rivers of blood which is the 'life' of all flesh. Her firstborn child, the savior, was Damu, a 'child of the blood." Damos or 'mother-blood" was the word for "the people' in matriarchal Mycenae. Another common ancient symbol of the blood-river of life was the red carpet, traditionally trod by scared kings, heros, and brides.

Taoist China considered red a scared color associated with women, blood, sexual potency, and creative power. White was the color of men, semen, negitive influences, passivity, and death. This was the basic Tantric Idea of male and female essences: the male principal is seen as 'passive' and 'quiescent'; the female principal as 'active' and 'creative', the reverse of later patriarchal views.

Female blood color alone was often considered a potent magic charm. The Maori rendered anything sacred by coloring it red, and calling the red color menstrual blood. Andaman Islanders thought blood-red paint a powerful medicine, and painted sick people red all over in an effort to curethem. Hottentots addressed their Mother Goddess as one "who has painted thy body red"; she was divine because she never dropped or wasted menstrual blood. Some African tribes believed that menstrual blood alone, kept in a covered pot for none months, had the power to turn itself into a baby.

Easter eggs, classic womb-symbols of the Goddess Eostre, Were traditionally colored red and laid on graves to strengthen the dead. This habit, common in Greece and southern Russia, might be traced all the way back to Paleolithic graves and funeral furnishing reddened with ochre, for a closer resemblance to the Earth Mother’s womb from which the dead could be "born again." Ancient tombs everywhere have shown the bones of the dead covered with red ochre. Sometimes everything in the tomb, including the walls, had the red color. J.D. Evans described a well tombon Malta filled reddened bones, which struck fear into the workmen who insisted the bones were covered with "fresh blood."

A born-again ceremony from Australia showed that the Aborgines linked rebirth with the blood of the womb. The chant performed at Ankota, the "vulva of the earth," emphasized the redness surrounding the worshipper: "A straight track is gaping open before me. An underground hollow is gaping before me. A cavernous pathway is gaping before me. An underground pathway is gaping before me. Red I am like the heart of a flame of fire. Red, too, is the hollow in which I am resting." Images like these help explain why some of the oldest mages of the goddess, like Kurukulla in the east and her counterpart Cybele in the west, were associated with both caverns and redness.

Greek mystics were "born again" out of the river Styx, otherwise known as Alpha, "the Beginning." This river wound seven times through the earth’s interior and emerged at a yonic shrine near the city of Clitor (Greek kleitoris) sacred to the Great Mother. Styx was the blood-stream from the earth’s vagina; its waters were credited with the same dread powers as menstrual blood. Olympian gods swore their absolutely binding oaths by the waters of Styx, as men on earth swore by the blood of their mothers. Symbolic death and rebirth were linked with baptism in the waters of Styx, as in many other sacred rivers the world over. Jesus himself was baptized in Palestine’s version of the Styx, the river Jordan. When a man bathed seven times in this river, "his flesh came again like unto the flesh of a little child" (2 Kings 5:14). In Greek tradition the journey to the land of death meant crossing the Styx; in Judeo-Christian tradition it was crossing the Jordan. The was the same "river of blood: crossed by Thomas Rhymer on his way to Fairyland.

Tantric worship of menstrual blood penetrated the Greco-Roman world before the Christian era and was well established in the Gnostic period. This worship provided the agape -"love-feast" or "spiritual marriage" -practiced by Gnostic Christians like the Ophites. Another name for the agape was synesaktism, "the Way of Shaktism," meaning Tantric yoni-worship.52 Synesaktism was declared a heresy before the 7th century A.D.53 Subsequently the "love-feast" disappeared, and women were forbidden direct participation in Christian worship, according to St. Paul’s rule (1 Timothy 2:11-12).

Epiphanius described the agape practiced by Ophite Christians, while making it clear that these heretical sexual activities filled him with horror:

"Their women they share in common; and when anyone arrives who might be alien to their doctrine, the men and women have a sign by which they make themselves known to each other. When they extend their hands, apparently in greeting, they tickle the other’s palm in a certain way and so discover whether the new arrival belongs to their cult. …Husbands separate from their wives, and a man will say to his own spouse, "Arise and celebrate the love feast (agape) with thy brother." And the wretches mingle with each other…after they have consorted together in a passionate debauch…The woman and the man take the man’s ejaculation into their hands, stand up…offering to the Father, the Primal Being of All Nature, what is on their hands, with the words, "We bring to Thee this oblation, which is the very Body of Christ." …They consume it, take housel of their shame and say: "This is the Body of Christ, the Paschal Sacrifice through which our bodies suffer and are forced to confess to the sufferings of Christ." And when the woman is in her period, they do likewise with her menstruation. The unclean flow of blood, which they garner, they take up in the same way and eat together. And that, they say, is Christ’s Blood. For when they read in Revelation, "I saw the tree of life with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month" (Rev. 22:2), they interpret this as an allusion to the monthly incidence of the female period."

The meaning of this Ophite sacrament to its practitioners is easily recovered from Tantric parallels. Eating the living substances of reproduction was considered more "spiritual" than eating the dead body of the god, even in the transmuted form of bread and wine, though the color symbolism was the same:

When the semen, made molten by the fire of great passion, falls into the lotus of the “mother” and mixes with her red element, he achieves “ the conventional mandala of the thought of enlightenment.” The resultant mixture is tasted by the united “father-mother” (Yab-Yum), and when it reaches the throat they can generate concretely a special bliss…the bodichitta-the drop resulting from union of semen and menstrual blood-is transferred to the yogi…This empowers his corresponding mystic veins and centers to accomplish the Buddha’s function of speech. The term “secret initiation” comes from the tasting of the secret substance. 55

In the occult language of the Tantras, two ingredients of the Great Rite were sukra, semen, and rakta, menstrual blood. The officiating priestess had to be menstruous so her lunar energies were at flood tide.56 She embodied the power of rakta, sometimes rendered rukh or ruq, cognate with the Hebrew ruach, “spirit,” and the Arabic ruh, which meant both “spirit” and “red color.” Throughout all Tantric and related faiths, the merging of female red and male white was “a profoundly important symbolic conjunction.”57

The Sufis, who practiced their own brand of Tantrism, said ruh was female and red. Its male counterpart sirr, “consciousness,” was white. Red and white colors alternated in the Sufi halka or magic circle, corresponding to the Tantric chakra and called “the basic unit and very heart of active Sufism.” The Arab rosary of alternating red and white beads had the same meaning: men and women coupled around the circle, as in most European folk dances.58

Red and white were the colors worn by alternating female-and-male dancers in the witches’ “fairy ring” of pagan Ireland, where the Goddess was worshipped under the same name as the Tantric earth mother, Tara.59 With men and women alternating as in a Tantric chakra, the dance moved counterclockwise or moonwise, as nearly all circle dances still do. Red and white colors “represented the fairy world.”60

The rites were often governed by old women, due to the ancient belief that post-menopausal women were the wisest of mortals because the permanently retained their “wise blood.” In the 17th century A.D. Christian writers still insisted that old women were filled with magic power because their menstrual blood remained in their veins.61 This was the real reason why old women were constantly persecuted for witchcraft. The same “magic blood” that made them leaders in the ancient clan system made them objects of fear under the new patriarchal faith.

Because menstrual blood occupied a central position in matriarchal theologies, and was already sacer-holy-dreadful-patriarchal-ascetic thinkers showed almost hysterical fear of it. The Laws of Manu said if a man even approached a menstruating woman he would lose his wisdom, energy, sight, strength, and vitality. The Talmud said that if a menstruating woman walked between two men, one of the men would surely die.62 Brahmans ruled that a man who lay with a menstruating woman must suffer a punishment one-quarter as severe as the punishment for Brahmanicide, which was the worst crime a Brahman could imagine. Vedic myths were designed to support the law, such as the myth that Vishnu dared copulate with the Goddess Earth while she was menstruating, which caused her to give birth to monsters who nearly destroyed the world.63

This was patriarchal propaganda against the Tantric Maharutti (“Great Rite”), in which menstrual blood was the essential ingredient. In Kali’s cave-temple, her image spouted the blood of sacrifices from its vaginal orifice to bathe Shiva’s holy phallus while the two deities formed the lingam-yoni, and worshippers followed suit, in an orgy designed to support the cosmic life-force generated by union of male and female, white and red.64 In this Great Rite, Shiva became the Anointed One, as were his many Middle-Eastern counterparts. The Greek translation of Anointed One was Christos.

Persian patriarchs followed the Brahman lead in maintaining that menstruous women must be avoided like poison. They belonged to the devil; they were forbidden to look at the sun, to sit in water, to speak to a man, or to behold an altar fire.65 The glance of a menstruous woman was feared like the glance of the Gorgon. Zoroastrians held that any man who lay with a menstruating woman would beget a demon, and would be punished in hell by having filth poured into his mouth.66

Persian religion incorporated the common primitive belief that the first onset of menses must be caused by copulation with a supernatural snake. People not yet aware of fatherhood have supposed the same snake renders each woman fertile and helps her conceive children.67 Some such belief prevailed in Minoan Crete, where women and snakes were sacred but men were not. Tube-shaped Cretan vessels for pouring oblations represented a vagina, with a serpent crawling inside.68 Ancient languages gave the serpent the same name as Eve, a name meaning “Life”; and the most ancient myths made the primal couple not a Goddess and a God, but a Goddess and a Serpent.69 The Goddess’s womb was a garden of paradise in which the serpent lived.

Phrygian Ophiogeneis, “Snake-born People,” said their first male ancestor was the Great Serpent who dwelt in the garden of paradise.70 Paradise was a name of the Goddess-as-Virgin, identified with Mother Hera (Earth), whose virgin form was Hebe, a Greek spelling of Eve. Virgin Hera parthenogenetically conceived the oracular serpent Python, of the “Womb-temple,” Delphi.71 Snakes living in the womb of Mother Earth were supposed to possess all the wisdom, being in contact with the “wise blood” of the world.

One of the secrets shared by the primordial woman and her serpent was the secret of menstruation. Persians claimed menstruation was brought into the world by the first mother, whom they called Jahi the Whore, a Lilith-like defier of the Heavenly Father. She began to menstruate for the first time after coupling with Ahriman, the Great Serpent. Afterward, she seduced “the first righteous man,” who had previously lived alone in the garden of paradise with only the divine sacrificial bull for company. He knew nothing of sex until Jahi taught him.72

The Jews borrowed many details from these Persian myths. Rabbinical tradition said Eve began to menstruate only after she had copulated with the serpent in Eden, and Adam was ignorant of sex until Eve taught him.73 It was widely believed that Eve’s firstborn son Cain was not begotten by Adam but by the serpent.74 Beliefs connecting serpents with pregnancy and menstruation appeared throughout Europe for many centuries. Up to modern times, German peasants still held that women could be impregnated by snakes.75

Whether initiated by a serpent or not, menstrual bleeding inspired deadly fear among both Persians and Jewish patriarchs (Leviticus 15). Rachel successfully stole her father’s teraphim (household gods) by hiding them under a camel saddle and sitting on it, telling her father she was menstruating so he dared not approach her (Genesis 31). To this day, orthodox Jews refuse to shake hands with a woman because she might be menstruating. Jews also adopted a rule apparently laid down by Hesiod, that a man must never wash in the same water previously used by a woman, lest it might contain a trace of menstrual blood.76

There were many similar taboos. The ancient world’s most dreaded poison was the “moon-dew” collected by Thessalian witches, said to be a girl’s first menstrual blood shed during an eclipse of the moon.77 Pliny said a menstruous woman’s touch could blast the fruits of the field, sour wine, cloud mirrors, rust iron, and blunt the edges of knives.78 If a menstruous woman so much as laid a finger on a beehive, the bees would fly away and never return.79 If a man lay with a menstruous woman during an eclipse, he would soon fall sick and die.80

Christians inherited all the ancient patriarchs’ superstitious horrors. St. Jerome wrote: “Nothing is so unclean as a woman in her periods; what she touches she causes to become unclean.” Penitential regulations laid down in the 7th century by Theodore, Bishop of Canterbury, forbade menstruating women to take communion or even enter a church. At the French Synod of Meaux, menstruous women were specifically forbidden to come to church. From the 8th to the 11th centuries, many church laws denied menstruating women any access to church buildings. As late as 1684 it was still ordered that women in their “fluxes” must remain outside the church door.81 In 1298 the Synod of Würzburg commanded men not to approach a menstruating woman.82 The superstition came down to the 20th century, when a Scottish medical text quoted an old rhyme to the effect that menstrual blood could destroy the entire world:

Oh! Menstruating woman, thou’rt a fiend
From which all nature should be closely screened.83

Christian women were commanded to despise the “uncleanness” of their own bodies, as in the Rule of Anchoresses: “Art thou not formed of foul slime? Art thou not always full of uncleanness?”84 Medical authorities of the 16th century were still repeating the old belief that “demons were produced from menstrual flux.”85 One of the “demons” born of menstrual blood was the legendary basilisk with its poisonous glance.86 The legend evidently arose from the classic myth of the Gorgon with her serpent-hair and wise blood, petrifying men with her glance. The Gorgon and the red cross of menstrual blood once marked the most potent taboos.87 The very word taboo, from Polynesian tupua, “sacred, magical,” applied specifically to menstrual blood.88

Just as primitives attributed beneficial powers to menstrual blood along with its fearfulness, so medieval peasants thought it could heal, nourish, and fertilize.89 Some believed a menstruating woman could protect a crop by walking around the field, or exposing her genitals in it.90 Peasant women carried seed to the fields in rags stained with their menstrual blood: a continuation of the custom of Eleusinan fertility-priestesses.91 Even doctors thought menstrual blood could cure leprosy, or act as a powerful aphrodisiac. Madame de Montespan used it to encourage the ardor of her royal lover, Louis XIV.92 Gypsies said a woman could win any man’s love with a potion of her own menstrual blood.93

As the former medium of reincarnation, menstrual blood was sometimes called a remedy for death itself. In the tale of Childe Roland, the elven-king roused men from the magic sleep of death with a “bright red liquor.”94 Early romances associated this universal heal-all with “the blood of a noble virgin,” as a wise-woman revealed to Galahad.95 The same belief impelled Louis XI to try to stave off death by drinking young girls blood.

Victorian superstition taught that a child conceived during a menstrual period would be born with a caul, and would have occult powers.96 Nineteenth-century doctors inherited their predecessors’ notions of witchcraft and evil, and so maintained that menstruating women are not healthy; copulation with them could infect a man with urethritis or gonorrhea. Dr. Augustus Gardner said venereal diseases were usually communicated from women to men, not vice versa.97 Speaking of savages’ menstrual taboos, anthropologists described the women as “out of order,” “suffering from monthly illness,” or “stricken with the malady common to their sex.”98 A doctor wrote even in the present century: “We cannot too emphatically urge the importance of regarding these monthly returns as periods of ill health, as days when the ordinary occupations are to be suspended or modified.”99

At the present time just as in the Middle Ages, the Catholic church still considers itself on firm theological ground by advancing, as an argument against ordination of women, the notion that a menstruating priestess would “pollute” the altar. This would not preclude ordination of post-menopausal women, but different excuses are found for those. The holy “blood of life” used to be feminine and real; now it is masculine and symbolic.
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Thu 07 Mar 2013, 06:56

The ancient shaman talked about two kinds of blood: inner blood and outer blood, and it is true that outer blood was considered to be unclean. In this it doesn't matter if it is from a female or a male.

Let me tell you an experience I had with "outer blood". Some years ago I encountered a women who seemed to have been hit on the head and was lying on the side walk. Around her head was a large buddle of blood and she was dying. When I approached her to help I recognized that the blood smelled really disgusting, because as soon as blood gets in contact with air it starts to thicken and smells nasty. By the time the ambulance arrived she had died.

It's the same with female menstrual blood...though it smells different than that of a dying person it still smells pretty bad. This is why in some prehistoric cultures the women would get a week off and live in a seperate part of the village, but not because god hates women, just for practical reasons and to avoid stressing out everyone including the woman.

What is true is that men themselves usually only get confronted with blood when killing another creature...and draining blood becomes important, otherwise the meat becomes bad as too much blood will stay in the corpse.

The concept of kingship appears to have developed from earlier priesthoods that, in turn, were derived from the figure of the shaman. I hope it is clear by now how the vampire can be viewed as the result of a misunderstanding of shamanic activity. Sometimes the shamans would drink the blood of the sick. The sickness was said to be contained within the blood, and some [north american] shaman claims his helping spirits are thirsty, so he swallows the blood in return for their guidance. So we see that the drinking of blood was an integral part of [some] shamans activities as well as those of the vampire.

In other traditions a shaman would only "suck" the sickness out of the bodyparts:

One of the techniques of shamans is to "suck out" bad spirits...as seen in the youtube at 3:35





Other traditions have different techniques to cleanse the body of a patient, but the task remains the same: the removal of illness-causing spirits
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  Sputnik on Thu 07 Mar 2013, 07:29

The Maya believed that every "authentic" human being was a shaman-creator and built his/her resurrected bodies through self-sacrifice and deprivation. Combined with this was the notion of the ch’unel, or animal-self, that was linked to an individual’s existence.

http://anth507.tripod.com/termpaper.htm
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Re: Etymological Studies

Post  KapitanScarlet on Fri 08 Mar 2013, 23:02

Good points sputnik on the sucking and swallowing for authentic healing intention, that was also interesting further up on the heartbeat control , i realise im just a passenger in my own bodily vehicle with certain influence but not total , the lights could be switched off any day Shocked
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