Water of Life

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Water of Life

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sun 06 Jun 2010, 12:15

The human body's chemical composition consists of a variety of elements and compounds. By mass, human cells consist of 65–90% water (H2O), and a significant portion is composed of carbon-containing organic molecules. Oxygen therefore contributes a majority of a human body's mass, followed by carbon. 99% of the mass of the human body is made up of the six elements oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus.

Your Body's Many Cries for Water by F. Batmanghelidj, M.D.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/7795795/Your-Bodys-Many-Cries-for-Water

As an aside...you are not necessarily...yourself...
Symbionts
There are many species of bacteria and other microorganisms that live on or inside the healthy human body. In fact, 90% of the cells in (or on) a human body are microbes, by number (much less by mass or volume).[3] Some of these symbionts are necessary for our health. Those that neither help nor harm us are called commensal organisms. Besides these, there are harmful parasites and pathogens.
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Re: Water of Life

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sun 13 Jun 2010, 16:53

Population that uses improved water sources as percent of total population. Green: 100-95; yellow: 75-94.9; red: 74.9 and below. Source: UNDP. Data as of 2006

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Re: Water of Life

Post  quicksilvercrescendo on Sun 13 Jun 2010, 17:53


By mass, human cells consist of 65–90% water (H2O), and a significant portion is composed of carbon-containing organic molecules. Oxygen therefore contributes a majority of a human body's mass, followed by carbon. 99% of the mass of the human body is made up of the six elements oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus.
The human body is anywhere from 55% to 78% water depending on body size.
To function properly, the body requires between one and seven liters of water per day and to avoid dehydration; the precise amount depends on the level of activity, temperature, humidity, and other factors.
Most of this is ingested through foods or beverages other than drinking straight water.
It is not clear how much water intake is needed by healthy people, though most advocates agree that 6–7 glasses of water (approximately 2 liters) daily is the minimum to maintain proper hydration.
Medical literature favors a lower consumption, typically 1 liter of water for an average male, excluding extra requirements due to fluid loss from exercise or warm weather.
For those who have healthy kidneys, it is rather difficult to drink too much water, but (especially in warm humid weather and while exercising) it is dangerous to drink too little. People can drink far more water than necessary while exercising, however, putting them at risk of water intoxication (hyperhydration), which can be fatal. The popular claim that "a person should consume eight glasses of water per day" seems to have no real basis in science.
Similar misconceptions concerning the effect of water on weight loss and constipation have also been dispelled.
An original recommendation for water intake in 1945 by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council read: "An ordinary standard for diverse persons is 1 milliliter for each calorie of food. Most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods."
The latest dietary reference intake report by the United States National Research Council in general recommended (including food sources): 2.7 liters of water total for women and 3.7 liters for men.
Specifically, pregnant and breastfeeding women need additional fluids to stay hydrated. According to the Institute of Medicine—who recommend that, on average, women consume 2.2 liters and men 3.0 liters—this is recommended to be 2.4 liters (10 cups) for pregnant women and 3 liters (12 cups) for breastfeeding women since an especially large amount of fluid is lost during nursing.
Also noted is that normally, about 20% of water intake comes from food, while the rest comes from drinking water and beverages (caffeinated included). Water is excreted from the body in multiple forms; through urine and faeces, through sweating, and by exhalation of water vapor in the breath. With physical exertion and heat exposure, water loss will increase and daily fluid needs may increase as well.
Humans require water that does not contain too many impurities. Common impurities include metal salts and oxides (including copper, iron, calcium and lead) and/or harmful bacteria, such as Vibrio. Some solutes are acceptable and even desirable for taste enhancement and to provide needed electrolytes.
The single largest freshwater resource suitable for drinking is Lake Baikal in Siberia, which has a very low salt and calcium content and is therefore very clean.
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Re: Water of Life

Post  KapitanScarlet on Thu 11 Dec 2014, 01:27

Great Business I'm sure  Cool
ICE ICE BABY
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Re: Water of Life

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